Resin Sacra

Eau de parfum


Details

Constructed around the captivating frankincense, the only ingredient that smells both sensual and ecclesiastical at the same time. As well as embracing its resinous nature with benzoin and cistus, a suede accord was added for heightened tactility.

Click the ingredients for more information.


Price From: £105.00
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Suede

Suede calls for similar notes as leather but with a lighter touch (less of the rich smoky notes more of the inky metallic isobutyl quinoleine). Added to that, the aptly named Suederal helps recreate the soft feel that makes suede so attractive.

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Frankincense

from Somalia

Resin from the Boswellia sacra tree bleeds out and hardens into tears which in turn can be distilled to produce an essential oil. For RESIN SACRA, using frankincense that had been extracted by the state of the art, high pressure CO2 method led to a transformed fragrance. Unlike steam that subjects the material being extracted to high temperatures and solvents that can leave a residual taint, CO2 leaves neither, and as such gives a purer result. In the case of frankincense the off-putting harshness had vanished. What was left was complex and deeply resinous but smooth too.

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Patchouli

from Indonesia

Naturals will always have one key advantage over their synthetic counterparts to justify their expense: complexity. Patchouli is simultaneously resinous, woody, earthy, fruity and ambery.

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Benzoin Siam

from Sumatra

Resinous benzoin siam smells almost exactly like the unpolished, more obscure parts of a wooden antique.

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Cistus

from Spain

Resinous, green and bitter.

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Ambroxan

Synthetic version of ambre gris, the all but unobtainable substance produced by the sperm whale. Although it lacks the marine note of the real thing, it does have the same ability to impart a soft roundness to a fragrance and boost the reach of naturals. Unusually for a synthetic it is produced from a plant (clary sage) and so shares many of its forebears characteristics albeit in muted form.

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Sandalwood

from Sri Lanka

A victim of its own success, sandalwood oil from Mysore, India was used so extensively (being of very good quality and rather low price) that it became a totally unsustainable resource; inadequate management meant the tree population was dangerously diminished. Since a ban was placed on its production the murky business of smuggling oils and/or cutting with other oils has arisen; something we want no part in. Fortunately Sri Lanka has provided the answer, producing oil that is both sustainable and of quality similar to Mysore (something Australian sandalwood could not offer).

So why all the fuss? Sandalwood oil is one of the few ingredients you could happily wear by itself. A unique milky note sits softly over a nutty-woody base.

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Vetiver

from Haiti

Vetiver (a grass whose roots are dried and aged before being distilled) has a distinctive peppery woody note that is easily recognisable and very attractive, whether used judiciously or as a main component.

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Resin Sacra