Salvia Sclarea

Eau de parfum


Details

Takes the clary sage plant as its inspiration; from its soft green scent right down to its velvety leaves. Like lying on lush cool grass on a hot sunny day.

Click the ingredients for more information.


£105.00
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Grass

Unsurprisingly recreating the smell of freshly cut grass (the real thing cannot be distilled) is something that has received a lot of effort from the large fragrance manufacturers; many people will recount it as their favourite. SALVIA SCLAREA uses Triplal, a synthetic with the strength of a mountainous pile of cut grass.

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Green Violet Leaf

from Egypt and France

All violet leaves are green but we thought it best to separate clearly the leaf from the distinct violet flower. Noble violet leaf absolute smells like it looks, densely green and earthy.

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Bergamot

from Italy

The best bergamot oil for fragrance (the oil we use) is produced in Calabria, Italy. Responsible for giving Earl Grey tea its distinctive taste, bergamot’s sophisticated, aromatic citrus note is one of the building blocks for all colognes.

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Elemi

from the Philippines

The elemi tree emits a resin with citrus ambitions. Rather like lemon sherbet.

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Clary Sage

from France

Carla, one of our perfumers, describes clary sage quite perfectly: ‘close to lavender but less old fashioned, more green and a little reminiscent of tea. Also very slightly minty.’

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Jasmine

from India

It takes (about) 7,000,000 flowers to make 1kg of jasmine oil; picked by hand in the early hours when the oil content is at its highest. The reward for such endeavors is an oil densely honeyed and floral but with an animalic note that takes it beyond mere prettiness.

Where lightness and transparency are needed (jasmine oil is far heftier than the flower itself) the synthetic, Hedion, can also be used.

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Oakmoss

from Slovenia

An essential oil in every sense of the word for any fragrance needing an ozonic, bracing, green note. It is also one of the most long lasting ingredients in the perfume palette.

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Cashmeran

Synthetic molecule so named because it gives a super soft, tactile feel to fragrances. Excellent at expanding the reach of natural materials, on its own it has a very abstract, hard to define scent that is best described as wet concrete (that smell in a city after a summer shower) with a hint of apple.

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White Musks

Musks are colourless, synthetic and contrary to what some people will lead you to believe, will not mysteriously attract members of the opposite sex. Nevertheless they are pretty miraculous; giants of the molecule world (about the limit to how large a molecule we can detect) they are very handy for adding staying power and feel to a fragrance. In greater concentrations they can also impart a smell of their own and because of this ‘white’ does serve an informative purpose. Not all musks smell like sweaty animals. ‘White musks’ smell like freshly washed linen but with the sensual softness of female skin.

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Salvia Sclarea