Laconia

Eau de parfum


Details

‘Everybody was talking at once, the wine was flowing, the food was being replenished, the sun which had been veiled came out strong, the boat was rocking gently…the lemon groves were in sight and the madness which is in their fragrance had already seized us and drawn us tightly together in a frenzy of self-surrender.’

Henry Miller – The Colossus of Maroussi

A vibrant sea breeze citrus. Succulent lemon and mandarin glint off aquatic greens - mint and violet leaf. Vetiver and cardamom provide elegance in the drydown.

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Price From: £105.00
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Lemon

from Italy

Citrus fruits are so forthcoming with their aroma that their oils can be produced simply by cold pressing their peel. The advantage of this are oils, untainted by heat or solvents, that resemble the actual fruits very closely and so are perfect for adding fresh, zesty notes to fragrances.

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Bergamot

from Italy

The best bergamot oil for fragrance (the oil we use) is produced in Calabria, Italy. Responsible for giving Earl Grey tea its distinctive taste, bergamot’s sophisticated, aromatic citrus note is one of the building blocks for all colognes.

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Orange

Orange

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Mandarin

Mandarin

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Water Mint

Water Mint

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Green Violet Leaf

from Egypt and France

All violet leaves are green but we thought it best to separate clearly the leaf from the distinct violet flower. Noble violet leaf absolute smells like it looks, densely green and earthy.

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Jasmine

from India

It takes (about) 7,000,000 flowers to make 1kg of jasmine oil; picked by hand in the early hours when the oil content is at its highest. The reward for such endeavors is an oil densely honeyed and floral but with an animalic note that takes it beyond mere prettiness.

Where lightness and transparency are needed (jasmine oil is far heftier than the flower itself) the synthetic, Hedion, can also be used.

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Sea Salt

Sea Salt

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Vetiver

from Haiti

Vetiver (a grass whose roots are dried and aged before being distilled) has a distinctive peppery woody note that is easily recognisable and very attractive, whether used judiciously or as a main component.

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Cardamom

from Guatemala

Anyone who has drunk Turkish coffee will know of cardamom’s ability to nonchalantly bat aside other strong flavours; innocent looking little pods of potency. Used with a judicious hand however it adds a highly unique resinous-citrusy note.

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Laconia